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Leucopleurus

Mammalia - Cetacea - Delphinidae

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1866Lagenorhynchus (Leucopleurus) Gray p. 216
1868Leucopleurus Gray p. 7
1870Leucopleurus Gray p. 772
1904Leucopleurus Palmer p. 374
1999Leucopleurus LeDuc et al. p. 639 figs. Figure 2
2001Leucopleurus Fordyce and de Muizon p. 179
2011Leucopleurus Geisler et al. p. 6 figs. Table 1
2013Leucopleurus Perrin et al. p. 571 figs. Table 1
2014Leucopleurus Murakami et al. p. 507 figs. Figure 10
2019Leucopleurus Vollmer et al.

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
RankNameAuthor
Synapsida()
Therapsida()
infraorderCynodontia()
Epicynodontia
infraorderEucynodontia
Probainognathia
Mammaliamorpha
Mammaliaformes
classMammalia
orderCetacea
Pelagiceti
Neoceti
suborderOdontoceti
infraorderDelphinida
superfamilyDelphinoidea
familyDelphinidae
genusLeucopleurus()

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
N. L. Vollmer et al. 2019Leucopleurus acutus partially overlaps in distribution with L. albirostris across the North Atlantic and can be differentiated based on the presence of a sharply defined color pattern, in part consisting of a dark gray to black upper jaw and entire dorsal surface, a white lateral patch starting below the dorsal fin and extending posteriorly, a white belly and lower jaw, black flippers, and a yellow or tan blaze along the flank. From a lat- eral view, the tail stock abruptly tapers prior to the flukes. Compared to L. albirostris, L. acutus has a longer and narrower skull (Reeves et al. 1999b). Additionally, L. acutus can be distinguished from all Sagmatias species based on having the largest lachrymal length and greatest preorbi- tal width (Miyazaki and Shikano 1997b).
Molecular evidence based on both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA data supports that L. acutus is differentiated from Lagenorhynchus albirostris and all species of Sagmatias, Cephalorhynchus, and Lissodel- phis with high statistical support based on phylogenetic bootstrap and PP values (Fig. 2, 3; Table 4). These studies reveal that L. acutus has no close genetic affinity to any other species, supporting the monotypic sta- tus of this genus.