Basic info Taxonomic history Classification Relationships
Morphology Ecology and taphonomy External Literature Search Age range and collections

Mosasaurus mokoroa

Reptilia - Squamata - Mosasauridae

Taxonomy
Mosasaurus mokoroa was named by Welles and Gregg (1971). Its type specimen is C.M. zfr 1, a partial skeleton (disarticulated skull and vertebrae), and it is a 3D body fossil.

Sister species lacking formal opinion data

View classification of included taxa

Synonyms
Synonymy list
YearName and author
1874Leiodon haumuriensis Hector p. 351 figs. Pl. XXX
1971Mosasaurus mokoroa Welles and Gregg pp. 79-98 figs. 45-55
1991Mosasaurus mokoroa Fordyce p. 1174

Is something missing? Join the Paleobiology Database and enter the data

RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
RankNameAuthor
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Lepidosauromorpha(Benton 1983)
superorderLepidosauria()
orderSquamata
Episquamata
ToxicoferaVidal and Hedges 2005
superfamilyMosasauria(Marsh 1880)
familyMosasauridae
subfamilyMosasaurinaeGervais 1853
tribePlotosaurini
genusMosasaurus
speciesmokoroa

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
J. Hector 1874 (Leiodon haumuriensis)"There are 15 teeth, averaging two inches apart, above and below; the mature teeth rising from a distinct elevated crown of cement—characteristic of this genus—while the immature teeth push their way through the cement, generally alongside or slightly internal to the base of the old teeth. The largest mature teeth have a black enamelled crown 1.5 inches in length, slightly curved outwards and backwards, compressed laterally with an obtuse anterior ridge, and more rounded but still slightly angulate behind, the surface being irregularly striate but not channelled."