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Zhangheotheriidae

Mammalia - Zhangheotheriidae

Synonymy list
YearName and author
2003Zhangheotheriidae Rougier et al.
2009Zhangheotheriidae Ji et al. p. 281
2010Zhangheotheriidae Gao et al.

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
RankNameAuthor
Amniota
Synapsida()
Therapsida()
infraorderCynodontia()
Epicynodontia
infraorderEucynodontia
Probainognathia
Mammaliamorpha
Mammaliaformes
classMammalia
Theriamorpha(Rowe 1993)
Theriiformes(Rowe 1988)
Trechnotheria
familyZhangheotheriidae
familyZhangheotheriidae

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
G. W. Rougier et al. 2003Zhangheotherids include Zhangheotherium and Maotherium, and they are medium sized symmetrodonts. The last uppet and lower premolars are molariform, with at least five cusps although forming a very broad triangle rather than the more acute trigod trigonid of the molars. The upper canines are doublerooted, reduced in size and not trenchant, approximately of the same height except the last incisor. The upper molariforms and last premolar have a welldeveloped, cuspidated, lingual cingulum in Maotherium, but they are short in Zhangheotherium. Large cusp B, cingular cusps e and d are tall and well separated from the rest of the crown. Four or more mental foramina are present. The coronoid process is long and narrow, inclining posteriorly at an angle of approximately 40 degrees. The condylar process is long, dorsally directed, and separated from the coronoid process by a deep notch that extends ventrally to the level of the alveolar margin or below.