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Martes zibellina (sable)

Mammalia - Carnivora - Mustelidae

Taxonomy
Mustela zibellina was named by Linnaeus (1758). It is extant.

It was recombined as Martes zibellina by Thomas (1911), Marmi et al. (2004) and Monakhov (2011).

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1758Mustela zibellina Linnaeus p. 46
1911Martes zibellina Thomas p. 139
2004Martes zibellina Marmi et al. p. 489 figs. Fig. 2
2011Martes zibellina Monakhov p. 75

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
OlfactoresJefferies 1991
subphylumVertebrata
Gnathostomata()
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Synapsida()
Therapsida()
infraorderCynodontia()
RankNameAuthor
Epicynodontia
infraorderEucynodontia
Probainognathia
Mammaliamorpha
Mammaliaformes
classMammalia
subclassTribosphenida()
infraclassEutheria()
Placentalia
Laurasiatheria
Scrotifera
Ferae()
CarnivoramorphaWyss and Flynn 1993
CarnivoraformesFlynn et al.
orderCarnivoraBowditch 1821
superfamilyArctoideaFlower 1869
Mustelida
familyMustelidaeFischer 1817
subfamilyMustelinaeFischer 1817
genusMartesFrisch 1775
specieszibellina()

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
V. G. Monakhov 2011Martes zibellina is slightly larger than other similar Holarctic martens (M. martes [European pine marten], M. americana [American marten], and M. melampus [Japanese marten]) but smaller than M. pennanti (fisher) and M. flavigula (yellow-throated marten) and has more dark coloration in the pelage. A variably sized yellowish (orange) patch (bib) occurs on throat and breast (Fig. 1), but it is sometimes absent; head usually lighter than back, sometimes whitish. Pelage is monotonic ranging from light brown (or sandy-yellow) to almost black; frequently occurs with sporadic white (gray or yellowish) hairs throughout the pelt. In the fur trade this is referred to as ‘‘sedina’’ (grayness [Fig. 2]). In general, M. zibellina is most similar morphologically to M. martes, M. americana, and M. melampus (Anderson 1970; Clark et al. 1987; Hagmeier 1961); however, it has a shorter tail and darker, more lustrous and silky pelage. Tail length with tip hairs is no more than one-half of body length (Ognev 1931). Skull bullae (Fig. 3) are extended and closer together than in M. martes and the beech marten (M. foina—Heptner et al. 1967). The internal one- half of the upper molar (Fig. 3) is wider than the external one- half (Aristov and Baryshnikov 2001). Bacula are 39–43 mm long (in adult males) with a forked end that forms an unclosed ring (Fig. 4) and so have morphological differences with M. martes and M. americana (Heptner et al. 1967; Pawlinin 1966).