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Acerosodontosaurus piveteaui

Reptilia -

Taxonomy
Acerosodontosaurus piveteaui was named by Currie (1980). Its type specimen is MNHN 1908-32-57, a partial skeleton (right lateral portion of skull, vertebrae, ribs, gastralia, parts of the limbs, and parts of pectoral and pelvic girdle), and it is a mold. Its type locality is Mt. Eliva (Sakamena Fm.), which is in a Lopingian terrestrial horizon in the Lower Sakamena Formation of Madagascar. It is the type species of Acerosodontosaurus.

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1980Acerosodontosaurus piveteaui Currie p. 501 figs. 1-8
2009Acerosodontosaurus piveteaui Bickelmann et al. p. 652 figs. 1-3

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
RankNameAuthor
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
Younginiformes(Romer 1933)
genusAcerosodontosaurus
speciespiveteaui

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
P. J. Currie 1980same as for genus
C. Bickelmann et al. 2009Aquatic neodiapsid reptile characterized by the absence of a quadratojugal and the presence of a short posterior process of the jugal, resulting in an open lower temporal arcade; at least 36 teeth in the maxilla and 34 teeth in the lower jaw. Differs from other ‘‘Younginiformes’’ on the basis of the following combination of features: neural spines of dorsal vertebrae intermediate in height between those of Thadeosaurus and Hovasaurus; transverse processes shorter than in Kenyasaurus; cleithrum present, in contrast to Galesphyrus, Thadeosaurus, and Youngina; postaxial edge of the shaft of the humerus straighter than in Thadeosaurus and preaxial edge of the shaft not as concave; radius of twisted appearance; ulna lacking an ossified olecranon; metacarpals longer than in Hovasaurus but not as long as in Thadeosaurus; intermedium more polygonal than in Galesphyrus; pubis with long tubercle, longer than in Thadeosaurus; femur not as slender as in Kenyasaurus.