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Sebecosuchia

Reptilia -

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1946Sebecosuchia Colbert
1970Sebecosuchia Walker p. 369
1976Sebecosuchia Sahni and Srivastava p. 925
1984Sebecosuchia Gasparini p. 86
2005Sebecosuchia Turner and Calvo p. 89
2010Sebecosuchia Turner and Sertich
2011Sebecosuchia Pol and Powell
2012Sebecosuchia Bronzati et al.
2012Sebecosuchia Pol et al.
2014Sebecosuchia Pol et al.

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
RankNameAuthor
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
Archosauria()
Pseudosuchia(Zittel 1890)
SuchiaKrebs 1974
Paracrocodylomorpha
Loricata(Merrem 1820)
Crocodylomorpha()
suborderCrocodyliformes
MesoeucrocodyliaWhetstone and Whybrow 1983
infraorderNotosuchiaGasparini 1971
ZiphosuchiaOrtega et al. 2000
suborderSebecosuchiaColbert 1946
suborderSebecosuchiaColbert 1946

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
E. H. Colbert 1946Basicall ycrocodilian in cranial structure and with secondary palate.Internal nares very wide. Whole skull, and expecially the facial part, relatively much narrower and deeper than in other Crocodilia; snout very deep and with median crest above. Orbits directed laterally. Teeth reduced in number and generally strongly compressed laterally, with serrated edges, the larger teeth with crowns almost indistinguishable from those of some carnivorous dinosaurs. Vertebrae feebly amphicoelous.