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Doswellia sixmilensis

Reptilia -

Taxonomy
Doswellia sixmilensis was named by Heckert et al. (2012). Its type specimen is NMMNH P-61909, a partial skeleton (portions of the skull and lower jaws, several centra, and osteoderms, as well as two possible limb bone fragments), and it is a 3D body fossil. Its type locality is Sixmile Canyon, near Gallup, NMMNH L-5700, which is in a Norian terrestrial mudstone in the Chinle Formation of New Mexico.

Synonymy list
YearName and author
2012Doswellia sixmilensis Heckert et al. p. 1336 figs. 2-6
2013Doswellia sixmilensis Sues et al.

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
RankNameAuthor
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
ProterochampsiaKischlat 2000
Doswelliidae()
genusDoswellia
speciessixmilensis

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
A. B. Heckert et al. 2012Species of Doswellia distinguished from the type species, D. kaltenbachi, by a higher tooth count, a prominent ridge on the postorbital, the presence of keels on cervical centra and the presence of discrete knobs or spikes on some osteoderms. The holotype is significantly (50 per cent) larger than any known specimen of D. kaltenbachi and appears to exhibit greater heterodonty in tooth size, but the type series of both specimens are too incomplete to reliably compare. We note that many of the diagnostic characters of the genus as enumerated above by Dilkes and Sues (2009) are not preserved in the holotype of D. sixmilensis and discovery of more complete material will doubtless modify the generic diagnosis.