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Nothosaurus winterswijkensis

Reptilia - Sauropterygia - Nothosauridae

Taxonomy
Nothosaurus winterswijkensis was named by Albers and Rieppel (2003). Its type specimen is NMNHL St 445530, a skull (skull with partial lower jaw and possible hyobranchial element), and it is a 3D body fossil. Its type locality is Steengroeve Winterswijk, which is in an Anisian peritidal limestone in the Vossenveld Formation of the Netherlands.

Sister species lacking formal opinion data

View classification of included taxa

Synonymy list
YearName and author
2003Nothosaurus winterswijkensis Albers and Rieppel p. 738 figs. 1-4

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
RankNameAuthor
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
orderSauropterygia
orderEosauropterygia
familyNothosauridaeBaur 1889
genusNothosaurusMünster 1834
specieswinterswijkensis

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
P. C. H. Albers and O. Rieppel 2003A relative small species of Nothosaurus (condylobasal length of the skull 126.7 mm) with the fifth premaxillary tooth distinctly smaller than the preceding premaxillary fangs; three small maxillary teeth preceding the paired maxillary fangs; jugal broadly entering the posteroventral margin of the orbit; body of vomer extending backwards for a greater distance than the longitudinal diameter of the internal naris; pineal foramen located in a distinct depression (trough).