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Janusaurus lundi

Reptilia - Ophthalmosauridae

Taxonomy
Janusaurus lundi was named by Robert et al. (2014) [urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:71E65B35-7215-44AA-BCE7-E9A3B265E04F]. Its type specimen is PMO 222.654, a partial skeleton (an incomplete skeleton consisting of a partial skull, representative cervical, dorsal and caudal vertebrae, a nearly complete pectoral girdle and left forefin, ), and it is a 3D body fossil. Its type locality is North side of Janusfjellet, which is in a Tithonian offshore shelf mudstone in the Agardhfjellet Formation of Norway. It is the type species of Janusaurus.

Synonymy list
YearName and author
2014Janusaurus lundi Robert et al. p. 4 figs. 3-14

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
RankNameAuthor
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Ichthyosauromorpha
Ichthyosauriformes
Ichthyopterygia(Owen 1840)
Eoichthyosauria
Ichthyosauria(de Blainville 1835)
Hueneosauria
Merriamosauria
Euichthyosauria
Parvipelvia
NeoichthyosauriaSander 2000
Thunnosauria
Baracromia
familyOphthalmosauridaeAppleby 1956
subfamilyOphthalmosaurinaeBaur 1887
genusJanusaurus
specieslundi

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
A. J. Robert et al. 2014A moderately sized ophthalmosaurid (estimated body length of 3-4 meters) possessing the following autapomorphies (marked with *) and unique character combinations: maxilla with extensive lateral exposure (short in Ophthalmosaurus and Aegirosaurus); lacrimal contributes to the posterior margin of the external naris (excluded in Cryopterygius and Athabascasaurus); posterodorsal process of jugal forming half of the posterior margin of the orbit (does not form any of the margin in Cryopterygius); narrow postorbital bar (broad in Cryopterygius, Athabascasaurus and Brachypterygius); absence of a squamosal (present in Athabascasaurus and Aegirosaurus); extremely gracile and constricted stapedial shaft*; reduced ophisthotic facet on the basioccipital (large in Palvennia); presence of an angular-articular contact*; extremely gracile dentition (more robust in Cryopterygius and Brachypterygius); interclavicle with an interclavicular trough and ventral foramen*; proximodistal length of scapula very reduced in comparison to coracoid length*; humerus with three distal facets (two in Nannopterygius and Cryopterygius); ulna is the largest element of zeugopodium (radius is larger in Cryopterygius); anterodorsal process of the ilium*; ischiopubis completely fused and lacking an obturator foramen (unfused distally in Cryopterygius and Undorosaurus and oburator foramen present in Ophthalmosaurus); femur with two distal facets (three in Platypterygius americanus and Platypterygius australis).