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Stibaraster

Asteroidea - Platyasterida - Urasterellidae

Taxonomy
Stibaraster was named by Blake and Guensburg (1993) [Sepkoski's age data: O Llvi]. It is not extant. Its type is Stibaraster ratcliffei.

It was assigned to Uractinina by Blake and Guensburg (1993); to Uractinida by Sepkoski (2002); to Asteroidea by Dean Shackleton (2005); and to Urasterellidae by Blake and Rozhnov (2007).

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1993Stibaraster Blake and Guensburg p. 110
2002Stibaraster Sepkoski, Jr.
2005Stibaraster Dean Shackleton p. 94
2007Stiberaster Blake and Rozhnov p. 524

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
Ambulacraria
phylumEchinodermata
RankNameAuthor
subphylumAsterozoa
classAsteroidea
orderPlatyasterida
suborderUractinina()
familyUrasterellidae
genusStibaraster

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
D. B. Blake and T. E. Guensburg 1993Five-armed, stoutly constructed asteroid; aboral numerous, small, stout, closely abutted; marginals in one row; proximal marginals much larger than aborals, vertically elongate, becoming similar in size, longitudinally elongate distally; marginals eaqual in number to adambulacrals proximally, more numerous distally; unpaired interbrachial marginal (i.e. axillary) abuts oral ossicular pair; adambulacral stout, broad, with flat outer face, spine base small, of equal size, ossicular furrow margin angular; ambulacral massive, with prominent transverse ridge separating broad podial basins; podial pores lacking; lateral articular facets in ridge-and-groove arrangements, these well developed on ambulacrals, adambulacrals; oral ossicles relatively small.