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Labyrinthodontia

Taxonomy
Labyrinthodontia was named by Owen (1860).

It was reranked as the suborder Labyrinthodontia by Cope (1875); it was synonymized subjectively with Apoecospondyli by Hay (1902); it was reranked as the unranked clade Labyrinthodontia by Säve-Söderbergh (1934); it was synonymized subjectively with Temnospondyli by Kuhn (1946); it was reranked as the superorder Labyrinthodontia by Romer (1947); it was reranked as the subclass Labyrinthodontia by Carroll (1967), Daly (1973), Carroll (1988) and Murry (1989).

It was assigned to Reptilia by Owen (1861); to Stegocephali by Cope (1875); to Batrachomorpha by Säve-Söderbergh (1934); to Apsidospondyli by Romer (1947); and to Amphibia by Lydekker (1889), Carroll (1967), Daly (1973), Carroll (1988) and Murry (1989).

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1860Labyrinthodontia Owen
1861Labyrinthodontia Owen p. 206
1875Labyrinthodontia Cope p. 10
1889Labyrinthodontia Lydekker p. 1021
1934Labyrinthodontia Säve-Söderbergh p. 17
1947Labyrinthodontia Romer p. 310
1967Labyrinthodontia Carroll p. 113
1973Labyrinthodontia Daly p. 568
1988Labyrinthodontia Carroll
1989Labyrinthodontia Murry p. 271

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
RankNameAuthor
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda
Amphibia()
subclassApsidospondyli
superorderLabyrinthodontia(Owen 1860)
superorderLabyrinthodontia(Owen 1860)

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
R. Owen 1861Head defended, as in the Ganocephala, by a continuous casque of externally sculptured and unusually hard and polished osseous plates, including the supplementary "post-orbital'' and "super-temporal" bones, but leaving a " foramen parietale." Two occipital condyles. Vomer divided aiid dentigerous. T\vo nostrils. Vertebral bodies, as well as arches, ossified, biconcave. Pleurapophyses of the trunk, long and bent. Teeth rendered complex by undulation and side branches of the converging folds of cement, whence the name of the order.