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Riojasaurus incertus

Reptilia -

Taxonomy
Riojasaurus incertus was named by Bonaparte (1969). Its type specimen is PVL 3808, a partial skeleton, and it is a 3D body fossil. Its type locality is ruta 26, Los Colorados, which is in a Norian fluvial-lacustrine sandstone in the Los Colorados Formation of Argentina. It is the type species of Riojasaurus.

Synonyms
Synonymy list
YearName and author
1969Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte p. 290
1969Strenusaurus procerus Bonaparte p. 291 fig. 6
1971Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte pp. 131-132
1973Riojasaurus incertus Benedetto
1973Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte p. 115
1978Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte p. 317
1978Riojasaurus incertus Bossi and Bonaparte p. 45
1979Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte p. 222
1979Riojasaurus incertus Jain et al. p. 206
1984Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte p. 130
1985Riojasaurus incertus Galton p. 672
1995Riojasaurus incertus Bonaparte and Pumares p. 342
1997Riojasaurus incertus Novas p. 681
2003Riojasaurus incertus Yates p. 322
2004Riojasaurus incertus Galton and Upchurch p. 235
2005Riojasaurus incertus Galton et al. p. 4
2006Riojasaurus incertus Langer and Benton p. 342 fig. 13
2007Riojasaurus incertus Barrett et al. p. 321
2007Riojasaurus incertus Galton p. 518
2007Riojasaurus incertus Upchurch et al. p. 76
2010Riojasaurus incertus Langer et al. p. 70
2011Riojasaurus incertus Apaldetti et al. p. 1
2012Riojasaurus incertus Ezcurra and Apaldetti p. 162
2016Riojasaurus incertus Peyre de Fabrègues and Allain p. 19 fig. 8

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
RankNameAuthor
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
Archosauria()
informalAvemetatarsalia
Ornithodira
Dinosauromorpha
Dinosauriformes
Dinosauria()
Saurischia()
Eusaurischia
Sauropodomorpha(Huene 1932)
Massopoda
Riojasauridae
genusRiojasaurus
speciesincertus

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
J. F. Bonaparte and J. A. Pumares 1995Melanorosaurid with the cranium provided with an wide preorbital opening, larger than in other prosauropods and with a vertically oriented lacrimal bar. Maxilla long and straight with 24 conical, subcylindrical teeth; mandibular articulation in the line of the alveolar plane of the maxilla, with osseous crests in the axial plane and anterior of the premaxillae and dentaries. Cervical vertebrae in general more robust than in Coloradisaurus or Plateosaurus, without ventral keel and with neural spines shorter axially in cervicals 7 to 10. Tall dorsal vertebrae, with well developed hyposphene-hypantrum and neural spine laminae low and axially extensive; three sacral vertebrae of which the two anterior are intimately fused. Pectoral girdle comparable to that of Plateosaurus-Lufengosaurus. Pelvic girdle comparable to these two genera but with shorter preacetabular processes and taller acetabulum. Humerus proportionally large and robust, with strong deltopectoral crest. Femur and tibia comparable to those of Melanorosaurus, but less robust. Astragalus and calcaneum of the type present in Plateosaurus and Massospondylus; characters of the hand and foot similar to Plateosaurus-Lufengosaurus. Disparity between fore and hindlimb less than in those genera. The humerus and radius represent 67% the length of the femur and tibia; the humerus is 80% the length of the femur; the tibia and astragalus represent 90% the length of the femur. (Translated by J. A. Wilson.)