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Chirotheriidae

Reptilia - Chirotheriidae

Synonyms
Synonymy list
YearName and author
1935Chirotheriidae Abel p. 67
1941Thecodontichnus fucinii Huene p. 5–6
1948Chirotheriidae Peabody p. 340
1952Chirotheriidae Bock p. 410
1957Chirotheriidae Baird p. 473
1958Thecodontichnus fucinii Kuhn p. 23
1959Thecodontichnus fucinii Schmidt p. 105
1963Chirotheriidae Kuhn p. 67
1963Thecodontichnus fucinii Kuhn p. 88
1964Chirotheriidae Kuhn p. 320
1969Chirotheriidae Haubold p. 91
1970Deuterosauropodopus minor Ellenberger p. 346
1980Thecodontichnus fucinii Tongiorgi p. 81
1984Brachychirotherium minor Olsen and Galton p. 96 fig. 3
2007Chirotheridae Calvo p. 318

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
RankNameAuthor
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
Archosauria()
Pseudosuchia(Zittel 1890)
familyChirotheriidaeAbel 1935
familyChirotheriidaeAbel 1935

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
F. E. Peabody 1948Relatively narrow, quadrupedal trackways indicating the normal tetrapod walking gait; in the walking gait a small pentadactyl manus impression regularly occurs immediately in front of, but never overlapped by a much larger, pentadactyl pes which generally resembles a reversed human hand. Manus and pes are digitigrade, and in large forms the pes tends to be plantigrade; digits I-IV point more or less forward, manus digit IV is always shorter than III, digit V is divergent and well developed as a crude prop for the foot; strong elaws are indicated on digits I-IV, infrequently on V of manus and pes, claw on III being largest; the footprints mayor may not show specialized metatarsal and phalangeal pads. Clear impressions often show a granular or beaded skin surface.
Reptiles represented by trackways probably dinosaur-like in form, and in body propor­ tions showed arrested tendency toward bipedalism. In smallest species pes only 3 cm.