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Eubrontidae

Reptilia - Eubrontidae

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1904Eubrontidae Lull p. 510
1915Eubrontidae Lull p. 194
1953Eubrontidae Lull p. 178
1958Eubrontidae Kuhn p. 22
1963Eubrontidae Kuhn p. 83
1969Eubrontidae Haubold p. 99
1971Eubrontidae Haubold p. 75
1972Eubrontidae Demathieu and Haubold p. 806
1979Eubrontidae Leonardi p. 244
1987Eubrontidae Yang and Yang p. 19
1989Eubrontidae Zhen et al. p. 192
2006Eubrontidae Li et al. p. 230
2006Eubrontidae Lü et al. p. 35
2010Eubrontidae Li et al. p. 726

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
subphylumVertebrata
superclassGnathostomata
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
RankNameAuthor
Romeriida
Diapsida()
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
Archosauria()
informalAvemetatarsalia
Ornithodira
Dinosauromorpha
Dinosauriformes
Dinosauria()
Saurischia()
Theropoda()
familyEubrontidae
familyEubrontidae

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
R. S. Lull 1904Large bipedal forms, more or less rounded claws, digits broad with distinct phalangeal pads. Foot functionally, possibly structurally tridactyl as the hallux claw never impresses. No caudal trace.
R. S. Lull 1915Large bipedal forms; claws acuminate to blunted; digits broad with distinct phalangeal pads. Foot functionally tridactyl as hallux claw never impresses. Caudal trace absent. Distinguished from Anchisauripus by the generally larger size and broad clumsy feet, and the fact that the claws are generally blunted, though this character is variable within the same species or even upon the same track (see figs. 50, 52). The apparent total absence (with one possible exception) o a hallux impression distinguishes Eubrontes both from Anchisauripus and Gigandipus.