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Deinodontidae (disused)

Reptilia - Deinodontidae

Synonymy list
YearName and author
1866Dinodontidae Cope
1915Deinodontidae Matthew p. 32
1922Deinodontidae Matthew and Brown p. 378
1923Deinodontidae Huene p. 457 fig. 3
1924Deinodontidae Lull p. 230
1926Dinodontidae Huene p. 101
1927Dinodontidae Huene p. 256
1929Dinodontidae Huene p. 155
1930Dinodontidae Russell p. 136
1934Deinodontidae Stromer p. 80
1937Dinodontidae Roxo p. 65
1944Dinodontidae Rapp p. 287
1946Deinodontidae Kuhn p. 65
1948Dinodontidae Huene p. 90
1959Dinodontidae Huene p. 122
1964Deinodontidae Tatarinov p. 538
1967Deinodontidae Russell p. 11
1968Deinodontidae Maleev p. 95
1970Dinodontidae Swinton p. 151
1981Deinodontidae Thurmond and Jones p. 144

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RankNameAuthor
kingdomAnimalia()
Triploblastica
Nephrozoa
Deuterostomia
phylumChordataHaeckel 1847
OlfactoresJefferies 1991
subphylumVertebrata
Gnathostomata()
Osteichthyes()
Sarcopterygii
subclassDipnotetrapodomorpha(Nelson 2006)
subclassTetrapodomorpha()
Tetrapoda()
Reptiliomorpha
Anthracosauria
Batrachosauria()
Cotylosauria()
Amniota
Sauropsida
classReptilia
subclassEureptilia()
Romeriida
Diapsida()
RankNameAuthor
Eosuchia()
Neodiapsida
SauriaGauthier 1984
Archosauromorpha(Huene 1946)
Crocopoda
ArchosauriformesGauthier 1986
Eucrocopoda
Archosauria()
informalAvemetatarsalia
Ornithodira
Dinosauromorpha
Dinosauriformes
Dinosauria()
Saurischia()
Theropoda()
Neotheropoda
AverostraPaul 2002
Tetanurae
Orionides
superfamilyMegalosauroidea()
familyDeinodontidae(Brown 1914)
familyDeinodontidae(Brown 1914)

If no rank is listed, the taxon is considered an unranked clade in modern classifications. Ranks may be repeated or presented in the wrong order because authors working on different parts of the classification may disagree about how to rank taxa.

Diagnosis
ReferenceDiagnosis
R. S. Lull 1924The gigantic carnivores of the Cretaceous have a deeper and more massive skull than do the megalosaurs. These latter show that a certain movement was possible between some of the bones of the skull (front-parietal and jugo-uadrato-jugal). This is absent in the deinodonts. The V-shaped cross section of the anterior teeth, so marked in the deinodonts, is merely a tendency in the megalosaurs, and the fore limbs are relatively much more reduced, with an extremely specialized manus.
F. v. Huene 1948Like Allosauridae, but only 2 fingers in manus; mt. IV with reduced proximal end. Senonian.